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Episode 38: Unveiling Vulnerability and Building Confidence in Business and Personal Growth

In this episode, we talked about overcoming perfectionism and embracing a mindset of progress. 

Our guest Matt Drinkhahn shared personal experiences, practical tips, and a 4-step process for managing emotions. We discussed the impact of perfectionism in business and personal growth, and how to confront fears and obstacles with grace and patience. Join us in empowering yourself to cultivate a positive mindset and take action towards peace, joy, and profit.

Matt is an executive business coach who specializes in helping recovering perfectionists systematize their businesses for more peace, joy, and profit. With a focus on productivity, Matt recently worked with a $25,000,000 company to improve their email inbox management and organizational systems. His coaching aims to provide practical solutions for business growth and efficiency.

Transcript: 

Matt:

This is what I love about talking with news anchors and, like, people. I would say that you are a celebrity. I don’t know if you’d correct yourself. You are a celebrity, and you are beautiful. And you were talking about your hair being out of and little people want to get to have that hair.

Kerry:

That is such a good idea.

Kerry:

Oh, gosh. Well, you know what? If you look very closely, it’s deaf I’m definitely due for a touch up. That’s for darn sure. But I really appreciate the kind words.

Matt:

Well, I’m just glad that I’m so tall. No one can see the top of my head, and they can see that it’s been thinning over the years. At 46, you still hear, but it’s thinning, so no one can really see it. I could see everyone’s fit. So

Kerry:

You can’t see it from the front. I mean, you’re good to go. Nobody would have any idea had you not announced that, Matt.

Matt:

Well, it doesn’t matter if they know or not. They still can’t see it, so it’s okay.

Kerry:

You know what? Now that we’ve gotten into this discussion about hair and our perceived and sometimes real imperfections, that’s what this episode of the Kari Barrett show is all about. And to people watching and listening, thank you for joining. I’m your host, obviously, Kari Barrett. If you haven’t seen the guy who you are listening to before, you haven’t been introduced or know him from social media, Matt drinks on, as in yes, get your drink on, is a business coach. He is a devoted husband and father. He is the host of the eternal optimist podcast, and as it relates to our discussion about hair, a recovering perfectionist. I kind of think I am as well, although I still have that sort of, like, nasty internal dialogue that goes on all the time, like, pretty much 247. Yeah?

Matt:

Mhmm. Oh, yeah. I’m with

Kerry:

that. Yeah. Stand by that for one second. Your business coaching stuff. Before we jump into, like, talking points and therapeutic needs, tell me very quickly a little bit about what you do with businesses, and then we’re gonna bring these two elements together.

Matt:

Great. Okay. So thank you, Kerry. And, yes, I’m an executive business coach and I help recovering perfectionists to systematize their businesses so they can get a little bit more peace, a little bit more joy. And some of them want profit too, so help them with profit. The point is this. I’ll give you an example. I just came from a coaching call a little while ago with a company that is a $25,000,000 company, and we literally spent an hour working on their email inbox management, a system of organization, because there’s a lot of leakage there in productivity.

Matt:

So we worked on that. The call before that this morning, it came from working with 1 of the largest 401 k department teams and financial advisors across the country and helping them to scale and systematize this throughout their advisor empire. So it’s all over the place and as far as the business coaching goes, we find out where there’s inefficiency, we find out where there’s room to grow and scale, and we lean in that and help create those systems. That’s what I do professionally.

Kerry:

And what you do for fun is all the other stuff that we talked about.

Matt:

Well, yeah. Well, actually, I’d say that there’s a lot more fun stuff in the profession, and, actually, the profession is pretty darn fun too because we’ve gotten to a place in business, thank god, where, you know, we’ve been in business for 10 years as a coach. You know? And after we got through the 1st few years of having to take any client we could and, you know, working through to get to a level of scale, now we can be a little bit more selective, but now every client’s an ideal client. So they’re all fun. They’re all real positives to work with. So yeah. Just You

Kerry:

know, I was gonna say, like, when I was on your show, when I was on your, internal optimist podcast, you I guess it was, like, a month ago or so now as of this recording that we recorded, it was very clear to me at that time that you did have a lot of fun within, like, the professional side of yourself as well, which I’m I’m sort of beginning to get there, but I’m not as far along in in my business as you are. I’ve been in it for about 3 years, and so I’m still in that place where I’m, like, figuring out what the right clients are. But I do look at the way that you like, your lived experience as a business owner and the things that you talk about that align with business and personal, and you’re sort of like my North Star. I don’t know if you knew that. But Awesome. But you are.

Kerry:

For saying that. Thank you. And

Matt:

and, humbly, I accept that as a compliment, and I would say that you can do it. You’ve got all of the tools. You’ve got everything you need. Just takes a little bit of time and the repetitions. And I think, I don’t know if we talked about this when you were on my show, but it was the quantity plus the quality plus the frequency of your practice, that will get you where you wanna go. So, and you’re well on your way, Kerry. I mean, you got the charisma, the energy, you got the network. It’s now just get your reps in, and you’ll be where you wanna be.

Matt:

Yeah. So

Kerry:

I wish you the best of luck.

Kerry:

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Well, you know, one of the things that we talked about, and we’re gonna dive into here in just a second, is some of that, like, mindset stuff. So, like, the perfectionism stuff, and that gets in the way I’ve now realized more than ever before. Like, I’ve always had this sort of internal personal dialogue, but I see now how there’s really no separating person and, like, the business. That sort of mindset where it has to be perfect and it’s I’m, you know, imposter syndrome and all the other stuff that goes along with it, it seeps into every aspect of everything that I do.

Kerry:

You know? It’s like Yeah. Business, wife, mother. You mean, how do you have so many questions? It’s it’s and it sounds like you deal with some of the same stuff when you’re talking to, like, your clients. A lot of it is mindset, like overcoming these sort of perfectionists, being grateful, being giving yourself grace. So I guess my first question here is, how do you cultivate that?

Matt:

Yeah. I’ll give you a personal example and a professional example. Here’s a personal example. My second daughter was born in 2016, and I was working virtually at home. Meaning, I was doing a lot of Zoom calls, coaching. Yeah. And I could hear her 3 rooms away in the house, like, crying or screaming or you’re still a baby. Right? And she was making all this sound.

Matt:

And I felt, wait a second, that my child is interrupting my Zoom call, my professional business coaching call.

Kerry:

She’s so rude.

Matt:

I know. So rude that the child here at 2 months, 3 months, 8 months, a year old is making all this sound. So Mhmm. The perfectionist me, I cannot allow that to happen when I’m on a professional coaching call. So I would yell her name. Lucy. Yep. Lucy, quiet.

Matt:

Not that she has any idea what that means.

Kerry:

Yeah. I was gonna say that. I can’t imagine that worked all that well.

Matt:

Yeah. It did not work all that well. Kerry did it around when I started to realize what was happening. I didn’t realize it at first, Kerry. I started to realize what was happening was that I was training my daughter to be terrified of my voice. And I am a new parent. I didn’t didn’t see that at the time. And I needed to get out of my own head with this perfect idea that it’s you gotta be perfectly quiet.

Matt:

Everything’s gotta be starting perfectly on time, perfectly professional, get the summary of the notes of our coaching call out, within a day. You know, everything is gonna be perfectly aligned. And I struggle with this, First with shame and with guilt, or yelling at my daughter. Right? And where this comes out to working on the game. How do we solve it? I didn’t know how to solve it on my own. So I joined a group called the Front Row Dads, and I got some support from a couple people in the group because I wanted to live in a yell free home. And I know that the only way I could do that is, well, actually, stop yelling. I didn’t know how because I was so trained.

Matt:

I think it’s gotta be perfect. So I had to start to view this lens of perfection a little bit differently. And I shifted the lens through help from my accountability partners. Here’s the shift for those taking notes. For anyone who’s listening, here’s the opportunity. It’s to shift from anytime you think it needs to be perfect or anytime you use the word should. Should is the biggest perfectionist word out there. Another big perfectionist word is but.

Matt:

You have a lot of buts in the middle of your sentence, you might be a perfectionist. You have a lot of shoulds in your sentence or in your inner dialogue, you might be really, really controlling of yourself and others. So if you find yourself using those words or you identify as perfectionist, one way is to start to realize and see the shift from perfection to progress. To see the shift from but to and. Mhmm. To see the shift from should to it is. And when you make these shifts in your mind from perfection to progress, what starts to happen is that, you know what? I offer myself a little bit of grace, a little bit of patience because I’m not looking for perfection, I’m looking for progress. I’m not looking to live in a yellow free home today.

Matt:

That would be perfection. I’m looking to whittle away until there’s a yellow free home. And that’s exactly what we did. And it took me a couple of years to get there, Kerry. And now I’m glad to say we live in a yellow free home. I didn’t do cold turkey. I didn’t know how to stop right away. I didn’t know how to stop looking when we’re scheduled from 1 o’clock to 1:45 to have a conversation.

Matt:

And if I show up at 101, I am just cursing myself. God forbid someone else shows up at 104. Then Yeah. I’m like, I can’t believe they wasted all this time. I mean, it’s such a judgmental place of self and others, this perfect place. And I wanna coach people, myself, you, everyone that we can just to have some grace with yourself and patience and to focus on progress over perfection.

Kerry:

A lot of times when, when people are thinking about making those sorts of shifts, and I know that I fall victim to this or I allow myself perhaps to fall victim to this, it’s very, like, black or white. I’ve either done it all the way and I’ve and it’s successful, or I haven’t completely reached the finish line and I was a failure. So, like, to use your example, I raised my voice one time today for a period of 15 seconds. Well, now the whole day has gone to hell. And how do you move out of that sort of, like, binary thinking?

Matt:

And so part of this is awareness. Right? Yeah. So I am aware that if I do this, and it ruins my day, my day is now ruined. I’m aware that’s my mental capacity at this time. Yeah. Right? So my next goal will become every time that I do something that causes me to just to say, you know what? My day is short or the rest of my afternoon is ruined. I’m gonna make a mental note of that. In fact, I might even carry a little notepad around with me.

Matt:

And every time that happens, I’m gonna make a note. Because I want to understand what’s the trigger that causes that to happen. Right? And number 2, I want to understand how long does it last? Because the key thing here, if you’re looking at what your triggers are and how long it lasts, Kerry, the key thing is that I am very aware of it happening. You know, if there’s a 3 step approach, step 1 is awareness. You know, what is it that we’re aware of? I’m aware that when I yell at my kids, I feel like crap and it’s gonna take me a while to recover from that. I’m also aware that I used to yell out loud at my daughter probably 5 or 6 times a day. Right? So over the course of time, what is my objective, my goal, if I’m a business owner and I like to take this business like intensity or focus to every problem I wanna solve. I would like to, over time, take it from 5 vls a day to 3.

Matt:

Or I’d like to take it because if I’ve ruined my day at 8 AM because of something I said or did, and I have a guilt or shame for the rest of the day, then I want to take that recovery period and learn how to shorten it. Right? Or if you really want to get to it, maybe we can solve and not yell. It’ll yell free in the front end. But before we get to that, I simply want to observe my own behavior and just see what’s happening. So awareness is step 1. So if I see that something happens, like a trigger happens, let’s just say the trigger is, someone is late for a meeting. Mhmm. Or I didn’t get the sales done that I wanted to get done in my business.

Matt:

Pick your trigger, whatever it is. Something causes you to feel in a way that might ruin your day or might cause you to be down. Okay? Mhmm. Well, let’s first isolate, identify what that trigger is. Alright. So let’s pull that trigger and see what it is. Right? So get as clear as you can on what the trigger is. That’s step 1.

Matt:

Alright. So you’re aware of the trigger. Step 2 is how often is that thing showing up? How often does it show enough? Alright? So I’m aware of what it is. I’m aware of how often it shows up. Now, my objective is to live in a yell free home, or my objective is to be able to recover quicker whenever I have these tough things that happen. So now that I’m aware it happens and how frequently it happens, now I might even start to track how long I’m in that bad place. Right? Or how long I’m in that challenging place. Any of these are things that if you’re aware it’s happening, you that’s step 1 is awareness.

Matt:

Step 2 is now let’s develop the action plan. Step 2, AAA. Step 1, awareness. Step 2 is action. Let’s develop the action plan around that specific metric and work on that metric. Right? So from a very tactical approach, if I know that I’m getting into a bad spot because I just got triggered because, for example, my Zoom, I click on to go to a meeting, and it says you gotta load this. Oh, a new update. Great.

Matt:

Right? So I’m 3 minutes late to my own meeting with 25 business owners. They’re there waiting for me. And in my own mind, I’m, like, cursing myself, because I didn’t do this in time. And all this stuff going on. I’m aware of this. Right? So I know the way that I personally practice this, and for those of you who want some practical advice out there, here’s the practical advice. Here is my action plan of how when I catch myself just losing it in the moment and really judging myself and being pissed off and talking all kinds of shit to myself. This is what I

Kerry:

do. Yeah. Yeah.

Matt:

Right? In my pocket at all times, if you ever see me in person, you’ll always see a large bulge in my pocket. Yes. What is that bulge? Up. It is. It is this. It’s some type of little small squeeze ball. Right? This is my internal optimist ball. Sometimes it’s a small smiley face, but I keep a little squeeze ball in my left pocket.

Matt:

So when I catch myself starting to get triggered with one of the key emotions, one of the 5 core emotions, if I want to be able to let that flow through me and recover quickly, I do the following things. I pause. I acknowledge that I am in this state that something just triggered me.

Kerry:

Okay.

Matt:

I breathe. Take a deep breath in.

Kerry:

Uh-huh.

Matt:

And deep breath out. And then I accept that I’m in this moment right now. It is what it is. I’m right here and I’m gonna choose what to do next. So PABA, p a b a. I pause, acknowledge, breathe, and accept. And that is how I regulate my breathing, which helps me to feel my emotion and be present with the emotion and able to recover quickly rather than the perfectionist mat. You just shove every emotion down to the side, just get back and stay focused, stay focused.

Matt:

No one can tell. Stay focused. And then later, I would just let myself have it. I would just be super pissed at me, and this inner stress would keep building up. And that’s where perfection would get me. It was always building up inside me, and I was wound up so tight. I don’t know if any of your listeners are recovering perfectionists or overachievers, or people that just wanna go go go win win win or do do do. Which

Kerry:

I wanna do it.

Kerry:

And I think sometimes that that shows up. Sorry. I don’t mean to cut you off, but I think sometimes exactly what you’re talking about shows up in them not willing to do the next thing or, like, whatever that next, you know, step is or challenge because they’re, like, they’re not going to do it unless they can do it perfectly. So not only do they berate themselves and beat themselves up and then also create all sorts of other issues, shoving emotions down, not being present, white knuckling it through the day, they ultimately don’t get to the next step because, well, if I can’t if I can’t show up and, you know, whatever it is, and do it absolutely perfect and not feel any self doubt and know that I nailed it a 100% every single time, well, you screw it. I’m not doing it.

Matt:

That’s right. That’s totally right. And notice my lens to the story that I’ve shared, you know, pause, acknowledge, breathe, accept this lens is started from this place of living in a yellow free home or starting in a place of my own emotion there. It works equally as powerfully in business. It’s after you pause and acknowledge that, you know, I can make a decision. I could take some action right now, or, or I’m, I’m, I’m fearing what, I don’t know what to do next or fear of success, whatever, whatever your challenge is. When you go through your self regulation process, pause, acknowledge, breathe, accept, you do that. What’s the next thing that comes to mind? For me, it’s been I’m gonna choose how to respond.

Matt:

I’m gonna respond calmly, coolly, and collected. These are the thoughts that go through my head. If it’s a business owner who’s having trouble getting off the bench or taking action, then you might go through the process. And then the triggering thought that comes up next for you might be this question. What’s the smallest, soonest step that I might take right now to make some progress? What’s the smallest, soonest step I might take right now to make some progress? And okay. So So never but, always and, because that’s a builder.

Kerry:

Mhmm.

Matt:

And at the same time, I might ask myself, what’s the worst thing that could possibly happen if I just took that tiny step? Right? And so many times we have a fear of something that is so far-fetched, and there’s no real way it’s ever gonna happen. And that fear

Kerry:

You’re like, you’ve catastrophized the situation.

Kerry:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Like, when

Matt:

I feel that I’ve got this big pimple on my nose, we did when we talked last, this didn’t happen. But after we spoke on my show, I had a big speech in front of 100 people a couple days later. And did you get a big zit? I got the first zit I’ve had in 15 years,

Kerry:

Kerry. The first it’s 15 years

Matt:

I haven’t had a zit. And I remember the last one too. Poor

Kerry:

shit, isn’t it?

Matt:

I know. It’s freaking crap. And I mean, I got this big pimple on my nose. I’m walking in to give this big speech, and here maybe your audience will lose this humor, so I thought it was pretty funny. At the end of all of this, I’m like, you know what? I’m just gonna own it. My perfectionist self is just gonna own where we are right now. And I actually did a crowdsourcing exercise with the people at this event and said, hey, team. If you can’t tell, I got a big nose.

Matt:

It looks red today. I’m not masking Rudolph. This is just a zit. And what we’re gonna do right now to have some fun is we’re gonna name my zit. We actually crowd sourced a name for my zit. Glory was the name of it.

Kerry:

What was it?

Matt:

Glory. We named it Glory.

Kerry:

Oh, yeah. Yeah. Right?

Matt:

Okay. And that may sound crazy to the people out there that are listening right now. And you may be like, why am I listening to this? Well, here’s why. Here’s why. No. That’s people’s biggest fear is the fear of the opinion of others. And that is what keeps me on the bench in business for so long. And Yeah.

Matt:

When you can learn to acknowledge that you’re my greatest fear that I had this pimple on my nose or the greatest fear that someone might actually find out I’m attempting to sell them something. Right? Yeah. Yeah. My greatest fear, can be realized that it’s actually all in my head. All my head. Right? So I wanna bring that out. That’s why I share the zit story, Kerry. Because if you can go and own a zit in front of everybody, you know what? You could say that you’re gonna ask someone to listen to you pitch what it is that you think can help them and help them in their life.

Kerry:

You know, I actually it’s just as a side note, God is it about 2 weeks ago in a wrinkle. And I was like, that is how, you know, life is bullshit. I mean, how is that possible? You’re only supposed to have 1 or the other, and you’re definitely not supposed to get a zit in a wrinkle. That’s garbage. I did name it though. I should have.

Matt:

Wrinkle. Yeah. Well, it’s it’s causing me to look at myself and just just smile that I am so with the with zits and wrinkles and and my hair thinning on

Kerry:

top and my hair.

Matt:

I don’t wanna hear anything from you because your hair looks amazing right now. I don’t wanna hear anything. Your hair looks great. No. It’s in

Kerry:

a ponytail. You can’t see much, but I appreciate the effort. Thanks.

Kerry:

Oh, well,

Matt:

it’s it’s it’s it’s challenging that we we sometimes judge ourselves so viciously when we’re really making much ado about nothing with a zit or

Kerry:

No. I I

Matt:

some little tiny thing. So I would invite the listeners just to take a deep breath, go through the 4 step process, the PABA, and realize that actually, it’s all gonna be okay. A little patience and grace to yourself.

Kerry:

I really do appreciate you saying that because it sounds very simple. Like, on the surface, you know, well, yeah, that makes sense. But it’s actually, like, getting it not just in your head intellectually, but actually bringing it into the way that you operate in whatever facet of your life. Like, that’s where the challenge really arises, I think, for a lot of people. We may intellectually know something or we’ve read it somewhere and academically, we understand it, but when it comes to living it, that’s another thing entirely. And so that sort of brings me to my next question, which I’m I’m hoping will poke some other holes in that in that trouble for moving from sort of one way of knowing it to the next, which is, did you experience Like, for example, you mentioned, you know, the Zoom call. Right? Zoom picks that opportunity to need to do an update, and now you’re late for your own meeting, and you’re worried everybody’s gonna, you know, think you’re an a hole or your your daughter, Lucy, as you implement this no yelling household now is in fact making noise when you’re on calls with clients, did any of that have any sort of negative or adverse effect for you with your potential clients or your prospects or just in your life? Or did people appreciate that you were an actual person dealing with the same shit that they’re dealing with?

Matt:

Yeah. I thought that it was a big deal in my mind until I asked them. Yeah. I asked clients how they felt about Yeah. If my daughter ever showed up. And very few of them actually said anything remotely negative. They said, oh, I totally understand. Right? And, I ask for feedback constantly.

Matt:

You know? And that might be a superpower for some. It’s like you’ll be able to ask people for their opinion of you and how you’re doing in business or as a husband or as a spouse, as a dad. Yeah. That could be tough too. That feedback that others give us, it actually clarifies our own journey. It actually validates us too because most of the time, they’re gonna say the opposite of what we were thinking. We were thinking that this was the biggest deal in the world, but I was a couple minutes late, and they’re gonna fire me. And in reality, no.

Matt:

No. They’re not. Yeah. Most people will give you some real human feedback that, maybe it was annoying or maybe it was off putting a little bit. It’s not the reason I hired you. So I feel that asking for feedback has been a real guiding thing for me, And it’s never been as intense as my own self judgment. So Mhmm. That’s a bridge.

Matt:

Kerry, it’s worked for me. It’s a bridge to overcome your own perfectionism is to ask others for some feedback.

Kerry:

And have you found that as you’ve started to give yourself a little more grace or perhaps speak a little more kindly even internally to yourself that has then spread over to, like, interactions that you have with, you know, maybe, employees or partners? Or do you find that you give them a little bit more grace and you and you have a little bit more kindness with them and that that influences, like, a better outcome or a better relationship or just did the 2 crisscross?

Matt:

I feel that way. I feel that way because ever since, I started to be a little more relaxed, a little bit less uptight about being perfect, I feel that that energy that comes out, the frequency by which our bodies vibrate, that energy is palpable. People can feel it. It’s a little different now than it used to be. So, yes, in ways that I cannot tangibly point to, with ease, I can say at the same time, yeah, people, when I’m a little bit easier on myself, they’re a little bit easier on themselves sometimes in my presence too. So I feel that you and I think we have this in common. When we go into rooms, I think that many times we might be the light or might be kind of a magnetic type of personality that maybe others kind of gravitate towards. And our energy can be that guiding energy in a room or in a conversation. And people will feed from that.

Matt:

So my light is going to be brighter than most others’ darkness if that connects. Yeah. Right? So I feel that they will feel that energy. And yes, there’ll be less judgment in general in the room when we’re present.

Kerry:

When we’re present and using that as influence. I wanna ask you one other question before we jump. I know you’ve got a book coming up, and I wanna talk a little bit about your livestream. But one question as it relates to this sort of removal or overcoming, recovering is the word we use at the beginning, perfectionism. I think then once you’ve sort of accepted that that’s something that you wanna do or something that you struggle with, maybe the next fear that pops up for people is, okay. Well, if I let this sort of, like, I’m gonna be successful. I’m gonna white knuckle it through the day. Like, am I going to lose my edge? Am I going to suddenly, you know, fall behind? Or, I mean, maybe losing your edge is the best way of putting it.

Matt:

Yeah.

Kerry:

How do you then maintain, like, the sort of discipline that is required to keep moving in the right direction while also bringing in this sort of, like, kinder, gentler self that you are creating.

Matt:

Oh, I realized the word and. It’s possible that both conditions can exist simultaneously.

Kerry:

I

Kerry:

You know, so Jim Rohn, the famed personal growth specialist expert, guy that trained Tony Robbins back in the day. Jim Rohn said that don’t wish for less problems, wish for more skills, wish for better skills. So the skill here, and you and I as really good business professionals, we can figure this out. We were at the top of our game, you know. And people like us, if we apply the same level of intensity and effort to solving the right question, the right challenge, then we’ll be able to solve it. The difference between those who get stuck and those who don’t is those who get stuck in perfectionism see it can only be one way. Right? Those who are able to overcome it see that it can be this way and you can also be at the same time kind to yourself. So I would challenge our listeners with a question, how might I stick to and live to the highest standards possible and be kind to myself at the same time? I’m not saying that’s an easy question to answer, and then you could answer it in one sitting and live it all of a sudden out of nowhere.

Matt:

I am saying it’s possible through the equation. Quantity plus quality plus frequency of your practice equals your ability to overcome whatever challenge that you’re trying to solve. My first book comes out on March 8, 2024. And Awesome. It’s The Eternal Optimist. And I’ll tell you more about the book when it does come out. And, I can share with the listeners that you can simply go to my website, eternal optimispodcastdot dotcom or come to any one of my social media accounts. I’m pretty easy to find.

Matt:

There’s only 12 DrinkOns, people that have my last name in the whole world. And I’m the only Matt. You know, so look up Matt Drincon, or just come to eternal optimist podcast, and you’ll be able to find all about the book. All about the book. It’s a journey of learning over time how to overcome those biggest challenges in your life and how one at a time I was able to overcome each of those perfectionism being 1. There are a number of others that we’ve all been through. So yeah. Yeah.

Matt:

But, I’m still here.

Kerry:

Absolutely. We’ll do all of that stuff, listeners will be in the show notes, so check it out there. But it sounds like its tactical and practical tips are also interwoven with your own experiences with each of those specific challenges. Yes?

Matt:

Yeah. That’s it. It’s yeah. It’s deep stories on the challenges. The moment when we realized what the challenge was, how we overcame it, and then tactics on how you can move forward from there. Yeah. That’s it.

Kerry:

You really do live this eternal optimist. So when we first met and I was on your show, I didn’t know you. We met through a mutual colleague. And you really do. Like, it’s infused in everything you do, which is why one of the reasons your live streams and your podcast are so amazing as well. So before we go, I tell folks where they can find your podcast, where your live streams air. I know they’re on Instagram. They may be elsewhere.

Kerry:

Dive into that a little bit.

Matt:

Go to Instagram, eternal optimist podcast. That’s my account. I do a live stream every day, Monday through Friday there, minus when I’m out of town.

Kerry:

Mhmm.

Matt:

It’s 7 AM EST, and I’ll rant for 10 to 20 minutes every day. It’s a different subject every day. You know, Monday through Friday is a standard topic each day of the week, but it’s a different call or different talk every day. And, yeah, just show up, ask some questions, be a part of the crew, and, you know, we have a good time trying to digest stuff that’s happening in the world. Trying to learn together, you know, how we might live this lifestyle of eternal optimism where we can see the positive in things and everything is an opportunity to grow and to learn and to overcome. So love to see you guys and girls there. Also, you know, follow me on Facebook, same thing. You know, I live stream on Facebook and Instagram every day.

Kerry:

Awesome. And then if people are interested in learning a little bit more about business, Matt Drankon, where should they go? Is it also Instagram, or should they check out your website or LinkedIn?

Matt:

Yeah. Oh, I think LinkedIn is probably the best place. You know, again, there’s 12 of us in the world, the last name, and there’s only a couple of them on LinkedIn. So just look at Matt Drinkon, and, you know, we’ll connect. When you connect, though, the way that you connect, please do not say, I will help you grow your revenue to x number by giving you LinkedIn leads. I get, like, 3 to 5 of those a day, man, every day. I’m not. I love that people are aggressive and proactive. I just don’t respond to those.

Kerry:

No. And, by the way, I’m not responding to anybody unless they can promise me at least 150 qualified leads daily. So, you know, there’s that too.

Kerry:

Yes. Yes. That’s right. Like,

Kerry:

That’s a big promise, my friend.

Kerry:

Yes. That’s

Kerry:

right. Matt, as always, it is awesome to connect with you. Thank you so much for sharing, obviously, your time, but also your spirit and your experience with us as well. You’re great.

Matt:

Thank you, Kerry. It’s been a real pleasure. So just God bless you. Thank you. And have a great day team.

Kerry:

Likewise.

Connect with Matt:

  / coach_drink  

  / eternaloptimistpodcast  

  / mattdrinkhahn  

https://eternal-optimist.captivate.fm…

Connect with me:

LinkedIn:   / kerrybarrett  

YouTube:    / @iamkerrybarrett  

Twitter:   / iamkerrybarrett  

Instagram:   / iamkerrybarrett  

Work with me: http://www.kerrybarrett.com

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