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Episode 39: Courage in Action with the World’s Best Courage Coach

Unlock the extraordinary potential within you with Episode 39 of The Kerry Barrett Show! Join Laban Ditchburn, hailed as the world’s best courage coach, as he unveils the secrets to harnessing courage for transformative change. Tune in for practical tips and engaging stories to help you unlock your courage and lead with impact.

Transcript

Kerry:

You are seeing another face on your screen, and that’s because this is a very special episode. As many of you know who joined me for these Thursday morning lives, Thursday morning depending on where you’re joining from, you know I very rarely have a guest on the show. Usually, it’s a monologue or a soliloquy about something having to do with communications, whether it’s public speaking or media training or Burns, and that’s who you’re seeing on the screen right there, his his title is the world’s best courage coach, and a lot of my clients deal with mindset issues, confidence, and certainly courage. I thought this would be a prime opportunity to introduce my audience to you. So, Laban, it’s great to have you with us. How are you?

Laban:

Kerry, as they say here in Medellin, Colombia, which for those who don’t speak Spanish means I’m very blessed. So it’s wonderful to be here with you today.

Kerry:

Oh my gosh. And I don’t speak Spanish, so thank you. I took 8 years of French in high school and college, and I don’t remember anything other than the curse words. Yeah. I only know the curse words. I think you said it very well at some point in there, and that’s all I know.

Laban:

It’s from The Beatles. It’s from a Beatles song. It’s the only words I know that you’ll understand, which is hilarious.

Kerry:

Oh my gosh. Well, not me. Apparently, I don’t fall under that umbrella. So I wanna ask you a question, and feel free to jump into a little bit of your background here. And, but but most interestingly is how you got this moniker, the world’s best courage coach. How did that come about, and what exactly does it mean?

Laban:

So one of my favorite questions to answer, and, yeah, if you’re listening or watching this, you either had probably 1 or 2 responses. 1 was, how dare he be called that? And the second one is like, hey. That’s pretty interesting. I wanna learn more. So whatever category you fit into, I’ll happily share with you how this came about. Because this really was born out of the lockdowns of 20 21 when my wife and I were still living in Melbourne, Australia. For those who don’t know, Melbourne was one of the most locked down cities in the world. And after a failed attempt to start my own business in 2019, I used to work in recruitment.

Laban:

We’re kind of forced into this period of 2020, and it’s when I created the podcast. 2020 is when I wrote my first book. And I had an experience with a coach by the name of Steve Hardison. Now you probably haven’t heard of Steve Hardison, but he’s a 65 year old Mormon guy out of Mesa, Arizona. And he is known as the ultimate coach. And a number of people that knew him and had been coached by him. To give you an idea, if you want to hire him, he’s $200,000 for 50 hours coaching. So he’s a reasonable chunk of change.

Laban:

He’s not the most expensive coach that I’ve ever heard, but he was certainly up there in the highest that I’ve ever heard. Yeah. And he was an enigma. Like, he used to coach people like Byron Katie and Iyanla Van Zandt, who was Oprah Winfrey’s coach. And, a t longer in getting very famous people onto my podcast even though I don’t have an audience. Right? Or a very big audience. And so I got this guy’s phone number, and I rang him up. And I was back in Australia at this time, and Steve picked up the phone.

Laban:

He says, hi. This is Steve. And I said, Steve Anderson? He said, yes. It is. I said, Steve Anderson, it’s Laban Ditchburn from Melbourne, Australia. He goes, Laban. So great to hear from you. I’ve been waiting for this call all my life.

Laban:

I’ve never never spoken to this guy before.

Kerry:

Yeah. I love it.

Laban:

Yeah. Me too. Right? Like, who answers the phone like that?

Kerry:

And I’m gonna start answering the phone. I’m gonna answer the phone like that every time from now on.

Laban:

I would love to hear the response from you or anyone that implements that because it’s so powerful. But he had turned down being on the Oprah Winfrey Show 4 times. Like, this is how much of an enigma this guy wanted to be. And so I rang him up and picked up the phone. He sees this amazing thing and I said, Steve, I just watched this video and it moved me. And I just wanted to ask you one very specific question. Because my philosophy in life is what value can I add to this person’s life? It doesn’t matter whether they are well known, famous or the cleaner, you know, down the road here in Medellin. It doesn’t matter.

Laban:

It’s just that it’s been a great practice and it served me very well in the last 4 or 5 years. And he said and I said, what do you need help with, Steve? He said, wow, Laban. I wanna acknowledge you for asking me that question. You know what? I’m 8% body fat, 64 years old. I do 10 miles a day. I got the love of a beautiful woman. I got all the money in the world. And, but I just want to thank you for asking me that question.

I said, ah, Steve, you’re so welcome. I said, Hey, are you still not doing podcasts? And, media, he goes, that’s right.

Laban:

I said, the reason I asked is I’m a writer, a speaker and a coach and I’m well on the way to being known as the most positively influential speaker in the world. But someone actually I was talking to recently said that there’s a lot of ego in that statement. Steve Harrison, a devout Mormon, yells down the phone to me. He goes, Laban, you tell that person to and he used the full word. Do you know who I am? And I go, who are you, Steve? All evangelical. He goes, I’m the best coach in the world. And, Kerry, the way he delivered that statement had absolutely zero ego about it.

Laban:

I was like, what is this? And I had a 15 minute phone call with Steve Harrison that absolutely changed my life. I got off that call and I called the guy Chris Doris, who had been coached by Steve Harrison. Chris Doris is a mental toughness coach. Used to work with PGA golfers and pro footballers. He does a lot of stuff with Salesforce and big blue chips now. Yeah. And at the time, my wife had had to fly to Russia, which is where she’s from for some urgent family business. And I was left in Australia because we weren’t married then.

Laban:

I couldn’t go with her. And they had all the mandates and stuff as

Laban:

Yeah. I said Chris and I were destitute Gary, absolutely broke. Like I’d been locked, locked in our homes and I wasn’t able to earn anything. I was a new entrepreneur. And I see Chris, I just spoke to Steve harness and he goes, what do you mean? I got it, it was not in a 15 minute chat with Steve Harrison. Just, what are you talking about? And I go, I was just talking to Steve Harrison. Do you have any idea of the gift of courage you had to bring to the world? And in that moment, the world’s best courage coach declaration was created as a declaration to how I choose to show up in the world. Nothing to do with my ego.

Laban:

And I said to Chris, I need some help, man. I need to create some money. And he worked with me for 4 hours and he’d only charge about $3,000 an hour to give you an idea for free. It helped me formulate this world’s best courage coach. And we were going to implement what I do with my outrageous cold calls to cold call the CEOs of the biggest companies on planet earth to deliver this declaration. And so I called Eric Yang, who’s the CEO for Zoom, and the line was a bit broken and we couldn’t really use his English. Isn’t that great either. And I called someone from Cisco and another big, you know, Walmart, these are and I couldn’t get through and it was getting late in the US.

Laban:

And I called this company in Australia called Hodges Real Estate. Mhmm. And Hodges Real Estate isn’t the biggest company in the world, but it’s the oldest real estate company in Australia. And the CEO is a gentleman by the name of Tony Zacher.

And I got a cell phone number from some software that I got on LinkedIn, which I can talk about at the end. And he picks up the phone, and he says, hi, Tony speaking. I said, Tony, Zachary. He said, yes, it is. I said, Tony, Zachary, it’s Labor Ditchburn from Melbourne. He goes, hi, Laban. Do we know each other? I said, Tony, we’ve never spoken, but today’s your lucky day. He laughed.

Laban:

He goes, why is it my lucky day late? And I said, because, Tony, I’m the world’s best courage coach, and I teach your people how to take bold, massive, and courageous action so that they can facilitate their own miraculous outcomes. Now, I swear to God this happened, Gary. 15 minutes with Tony Zarka. He invited me back the following Wednesday for a virtual Zoom call because we’re still locked down in Melbourne at this point to present for training and coaching for some business. And I had nothing more than this outrageous cold call. And so I jumped on this call. What yelling spilled forth into these outrageous scenarios that I’ve got myself into as a direct result of that one particular call. And I wish that there was a part of the story that was like, yeah. And he signed the check.

Laban:

Like, we never did any work to give, but Tony did his bit for me. That experience was far more valuable than if I’d gotten the money, that would have normalized, and I wouldn’t have played any bigger. Yeah. So now I get to pitch, like, multi million dollars, pieces of work for different companies and all outrageous kinds of stuff now. And so, anyway, this is the story about how the world’s best coverage coach came about.

Kerry:

I love that. And I wanna ask you a question because you bring up an element that I hadn’t necessarily planned on asking you about, but I see some of my own struggles. And, certainly, like, the small business owners that I work with, some of their struggles in the story that you just related, which is I’m playing small. And it whether it’s I have I have trouble asking for my value or I, am afraid for some reason or I don’t fully recognize it, when you when you threw out that, that number, right, regardless of the fact that you might have been destitute and you maybe you didn’t even feel necessarily internally that it was you know, he was gonna bite. Like, what in that moment changed for you when suddenly you felt okay. Okay. Not just I’m gonna force myself to do it because it’s a practice and or an exercise in courage. Like, what was that? How did that shift happen? Because I undervalue myself all the frigging time when I pitch myself to clients.

Kerry:

And sometimes if they can’t afford me, even at that rate, I’ll drop my prices further because I have a crappy mindset with money.

Laban:

22 things, Kerry, and I’m really grateful you asked that because you’re asking a question that everyone thinks about myself included. I made a conscious effort after reading a couple of different books. And unlike you, I’ve read lots of books in the last 6 years and I read several books, but it was a book around negative self talk. And that’s been the theme across a number of books, but I deliberately removed as much negative self talk. So you’ll never hear me speak poorly myself in that context. Okay. Because this the the power of that language, my wife is a, hypnotherapist, and she spends her days undoing the 90 5% of the subconscious sabotage that that goes on to

Kerry:

people. And it’s so it’s so automatic. We don’t even have it baked into so many of us. It’s like we don’t even necessarily recognize it until we get intentional about listening to it. You know? Even as simple as, like, taking a win and dismissing it as a fluke without even recognizing it. That is self sabotage. That is negative head trash even if you’re not consciously doing it. So interesting.

Laban:

No. No. It’s fine. It’s fine because, like, I’ll give you an example of something that’s worked very well. I interviewed, a lot of you would have heard of Jack Canfield who co worked at Yeah. Yep. That’s awesome. Successful.

Laban:

Right? He shared with me in an interview that he had a swear jar at home and instead of putting money in for profanity, they put money in for negative self-talk. So I implemented that into the mastermind that I run. If anyone uses negative self talk, it’s a $10 fine that goes into a kitty towards a charity. And as a result, even very wealthy people don’t wanna spend money on negative self-talk. So this is the first thing I would say. The second thing is, no matter

Laban:

broken destitute that I was, I still had my boundaries. I knew the amount of work it was gonna take to get this company and the people to where he wanted to go was gonna take that kind of money. And you might think, oh, labor wouldn’t be creating numbers. Like, I did the calculations with the time and the effort. So the significance around what we charge, and don’t get me wrong folks, I’ve been guilty of this too, but what we charge is inextricably linked to our levels of self worth. And as soon as you hear that for the first time, you’re like, oh. Does that mean I don’t think very highly of myself? And that can come from conditioning from when my kids and all kinds of stuff. But you can change it.

Laban:

Clients get better and easier the more we charge. You can focus more effort on the outcome faster when you’ve got less administrative tasks to muck around. So once you realize that, at least you can do something about it. I’m not here to judge you. Why would you do that to yourself?

Kerry:

Yeah. Energetically, it’s so it’s so different as well. I mean, I it was on, not to belabor the point, but connecting the dots, at least in my own mind with what you’re saying in some recent experiences, I was on one call yesterday where it was not the right it’s somebody a discovery call that couldn’t work with me due to price point. And I considered for a second dropping my my program rates. And then I had somebody else who I couldn’t even finish the pitch, and she was like, I’m in. Do whatever the price is. Just tell me what it is and send me the invoice. And that, while not as dramatic as your experience that you relayed, created a similar I don’t know if it’s like a feedback loop or whatever, but I I recognized, okay, when the when the right people are there and that’s a big part of it as well, getting your getting yourself in front of the right people.

Kerry:

But the change does begin to happen, but it starts internally for so many of us.

Laban:

Well, the the only I think I’d add to that as well is that once you receive payment for an invoice, once you increase your prices significantly, for me, at least, I level up in terms of how I am going to create an outcome for this person and I’ve become, so it improves me. And then the people at the top. And I, when I say the top, I’m talking about high integrity people. So I have a list of musts for clients and it’s about 10 bullet points. And if they don’t fall within that parameter, I just can walk away. So that frees up a lot of time as well. And it and it so if I send them the list and say, what do you think of this? They’re like, oh my god. This is me.

Laban:

And they’re like, oh, yeah. I’m 7 out of 10 things. It’s always a no. Yeah. So and and it helps qualify them in or out. And, and people at the top, again, a lot of people have all the financial resources that need your skills. How many people are teaching what you teach Gary to have an Emmy? Like, like 10 Yeah. 5? I don’t know.

Laban:

Like, probably you. I don’t know. Like like and it’s not that you’re putting all the gravitas on that, but that’s indicative of the kind of person, the discipline you’ve had in your life. And I’ve really enjoyed learning your story and researching this because even though I’m a guest, I wanna know about you. And I understand you’ve overcome major personal challenges and all this incredible stuff. That is valuable to people that need to pay. Otherwise, they will not pay attention.

And even when you charge $10 for something, there’s a certain level of people who, because of their net worth, won’t pay the amount of attention that they need if they’re gonna pay $100,000. Yeah. And with all the financial resources coming in, then you can free up your time to give more pro bono stuff to the people that don’t have the resources. They can read our books, they can jump on, and listen to our podcasts. They can, you know, whatever else it is for free.

Kerry:

That’s why I do.

Laban:

Do you know what I mean? So it’s not like, because I bet you’re you’re like me in many ways, massive impact and feel for people, and that’s why you wanna become a vet partially because you Yeah. Put a soft touch. You know what I mean? So just my 2ยข, but

Kerry:

Yeah. You did your research. Well and it’s interesting too, and I, and I, I’m gonna bring this up because you and I talked a little bit about it before the show went live. And you read some of my story about experiencing multiple miscarriages when I was specifically, we were trying for our second and our third. And you and your wife also we experienced far more than I did, but we talked about how those while we might not recognize courage in the business sense and in the personal sense as having, very being very intimately connected, they are. And you describe your wife as one of the most courageous people that you know as well. If you’re comfortable, I’d love to dive into that a little bit more.

Laban:

Oh, I love hearing this because, you know, behind every great man’s, an even greater woman in many cases. And

Kerry:

Not mine.

Laban:

He’s an air force. Isn’t he a jet fighter? That’s some of my favorites. So for context, my wife and I have just experienced our 20th consecutive miscarriage.

Kerry:

Right? Sorry.

Laban:

Yeah. And and and no. No. No. Please. It’s fine. Like, we talk about this stuff publicly a lot because we’ve seen the power of sharing this. So my wife is from Russia originally, and I’m gonna share something pretty heavy.

Laban:

So if you got kids in the room, maybe just block their ears for a second. But she grew up in a place called Saka Lin Island, which is just north of Japan. And she’s a quarter Japanese and three quarters Russian. She’s stunning. Stunningly beautiful.

Kerry:

I’ve seen your Instagram. She is.

Laban:

Is she? Right? And, unfortunately, she, from the age of 15 till she’s 21, experienced systemic childhood sexual abuse from a stepfather. And there were 2 pregnancies from the abuse and 2 illegal abortions with no aftercare. 1 of which damaged the uterus. We understand that the cause of all the miscarriages and the ectopic pregnancies has been the result of the damage to that. So she told me this a year into our relationship. And she and I have been together for 6 years in September. Do you have an idea? Right? We’ve been married for about 2 years. And that was off the back of me at the very beginning of our relationship because of my hedonistic past.

Laban:

I said, Anna, I’ve lived a life, and I want you to feel comfortable asking anything you want about my history as long as you’re happy to hear the answer. And, boy, howdy, Jerry, does she take advantage of that opportunity. And then I was forced to reveal some parts of me that I thought were gonna be kept prisoner for the rest of my life, thankfully. And I was able to share them and there was no judgment, and she accepted me for who I was and the foibles that I had. And a year later, she opened up and told me about this. So she started a healing journey at that point. I said, darling, you gotta heal from this. And she tried everything and this is where hypnotherapy came into it.

Laban:

But as a result, that trip back to Russia that Anna had that I mentioned earlier was to go and testify against this guy when she told her mom about it. So she went through polygraph examinations, physical gynecological examinations, and I ended up dismissing the case. But because it wasn’t there wasn’t enough evidence in such a long time ago because she’s 36 now. Right? But what she did do, she used the power of the media and she approached 3 different major newspapers here. And one of them told her story. And in Russia, they don’t really publish stuff like this. And there’s not much Pulitzer the put you in being

Kerry:

being present. I mean, all of it. It’s just I didn’t. I didn’t know that element of her story, and I appreciate you sharing with us because that is powerful stuff.

Laban:

Oh, my pleasure. I mean, well, I know I have a friend back in Australia who had one miscarriage and his wife went into a depression for 18 months. Like, yeah. If she had known and had access to these kinds of stories, how maybe would she have handled that? How would she have been able to thrive rather than suffer? You know, this is the power of storytelling and what you do is why, why it’s so important about becoming a really confident storyteller because people don’t remember what you say and what you do necessarily remember how you make them feel. Right. And, and so learning to tell them, tell your stories from a position of power, not from victimhood, is the ultimate comeback story.

Kerry:

Yeah. Yeah. You don’t want your audience to feel like a therapist.

Laban:

You want them to win the stage.

Kerry:

Yeah. You want them to come away with a strong empowering message, and that that ability to tell a story or share something emotional as it relates to your your audience’s struggles, that is applicable whether you are talking to somebody who owns a micro business or you are talking to a CEO of a multinational, multi, you know, $1,000,000,000 annual revenue sort of company. Like, the storytelling component is applicable across all industries, across all walks of life, across all levels of income, you know, socioeconomic status, however it is you want you look at it. I feel like oftentimes in the corporate world, there are assumptions made that storytelling isn’t quite as important. We just want the data and the statistics. And, really, at the end of the day, whether you’re teaching, whether you’re selling, whether you are creating content, whatever it is, that’s the stuff that that’s what holds it all together. And it is interesting you mentioned, and I I don’t wanna go back and forth too much, but you mentioned a little bit when you were sharing the story of your wife, how you sort of opened yourself up and said, you know, you can ask me anything about my past, and I think you described it as hedonistic. And when I was reading doing my research on you, you mentioned in that research or that I read, you overcame a dysfunctional childhood.

Kerry:

Your parents had an awful divorce. And I wanna just underscore that sometimes when we’re adulting, we feel like the things that happened to us when we were younger are they shouldn’t be relevant or they shouldn’t affect us in the way that they still do. You know? I was bullied, and my parents also had a horrible divorce not until I was 37, but that’s a whole nother story. But my point is it still affects me. And while I used to sort of shirk from that and not and and think it was, a weakness, and sometimes, to be honest with you, when I’m in a bad place, I still do consider it that way, but I have recognized that without listen. From from me to, you know, the the person you mentioned, like, the the guys picking up the garbage on the street to a CEO of a multinational organization. We all are influenced or informed, whether we’re conscious of it or not by that sort of stuff, and it directly plays into the way that we either manufacture courage or are able to develop it authentically as we as we grow.

Laban:

Do you know what, Kerry? I received a compliment the other day from, a former, a sort of pilot, actually. Gentleman by the time I’m a captain Shalley plum, and I just share this because it’s relevant. Cause I know your husband was a pilot as well. He was a guest on my podcast about 3 years ago and Charlie Palmer shot down over that. On his last mission in the Vietnam war. And it was captured by the Vietcong and held prisoner for 6 and a half years. And it was the same and how do I Hilton? They called it, which is the same division as we have where Senator John McCain was based. Just to give people some context for 4 and a half years.

Laban:

This guy was getting an 8 foot by 8 foot. So no light, and I was forbidden to talk. And if, if, you know, you want to learn more about his story, just get on the chin, what you have to do with them. Incredible. And he’s a professional speaker because we’re in the world. He’s 80 2 now. And he was asking me, you know, how things are going and how’s Adam and I, I should, you know, what, what I shared with you guys about these miscarriages. It’s been a big part of our life.

Laban:

We’ve been on the road for 2 and a half years and been going through these experiences in foreign countries where we don’t speak the language, you know, ending up in emergency rooms and that kind of thing. And, you know, I, we take full responsibility for that, but he said, Laban, you are one of the most courageous people I’ve ever met and resilient people have been there. And I was like, this guy is a prisoner of war. Or like, maybe there’s something in this and I’m not sharing this to stroke my ego. Like what I want, what I want people to understand is that, Whatever you’ve gone through, whatever your major trauma, whatever adversity, like find a way to overcome it and then use it as your new fuel source and your superpower because it makes us so relatable. If I get on here and superficial, and I know, you know, from coming from the media as well, like, the news typically very superficial label stuff in terms of getting to know the host and the presenters. The fact that you shared this information about the miscarriages automatically indeed meant even more to you and made me care even more about creating a better experience for the audience today.

Laban:

Not that I was coming in half assed, but like you can see the power of it. The biggest issue I have now, if you can call it that, is that my memory, which is very good, needs to get even better to remember everyone because I’m becoming so bloody memorable because of the storytelling. They’re like, oh, live it. Like, and someone that’s just, you know, shared something superficial. So it’s kind of their fault. So become more memorable by owning your stuff, using it as your new superpower and telling stories.

Kerry:

There you go. I love it. And you’re and you’re 100% right. And, you know, I want to ask I sort of switch gears here now because, unfortunately, we’re coming up on time, although we’ve gone a little bit over because your stories are very good. You mentioned when we first started this conversation that your call, your code, could call Steve. And I’m guessing that the skill that it took to first of all, you should write a book on how you do that. That’s my first, my first suggestion. I just bought a book actually that dives into exactly how to create memorable cold calls that people will pick up and and how to get into the ear of

You understand how to bring them in and then use that interview to create a memorable experience for the audience. And a lot of my clients and and and people that I speak with who maybe aren’t clients but are interested in creating visibility or sales opportunities or lead gen or even just having a platform where they can invite somebody to share their own story as a way for visibility and growth. They’re curious about how they do this as well, and I would love to know a little bit about what Podcast Heroes is and if there are any sort of takeaways that people can begin to at least sort of rattle around as they ponder putting a podcast in place for themselves and how to bring in great guests and create memorable experiences for their own audiences.

Laban:

Well, I’m into that, Kerry. And I like the reason I created this, I got some great advice from people who are very, very successful in the marketing space. And they’re like, they’ve been like, we have never met anyone better than you at reaching out and connecting with these a list guests. And it’s a list in whatever niche you’re in, by the way. Yeah. They don’t have to be famous. For me, the podcast is called Become Your Own Superhero. So I wanna interview brilliant speakers that have a story that will inspire and motivate and empower people to take action for themselves.

Laban:

And, like, 8 episodes on, I got Les Brown, the motivational speaker.

Kerry:

Yeah. Yeah. I know that name. Yeah.

Laban:

Right. He ended up giving me the blueprint for my book, bid on you, and then wrote the forward for it for free, and I didn’t ask him. And, like, there’s 220 episodes I’ve done over the last 4 years, and I’ve generated and I worked this out when I credit the course over a million. It’s a million one now in 3 stuff from podcast guests and the introductions that they’ve made to other people. Mhmm. Stuff. And a lot of it’s priceless as well. Introductions, like, endorsements from just the most incredible people. And I’m not a famous person yet.

Laban:

I’m not a super well known person. I’ve experienced a lot of censorship on my YouTube channel because of the people I’ve interviewed. And so I I teach anyone that has a platform, whether it be a podcast or a YouTube or a Rumble, whatever it is, that wants to use the power of borrowed ethos by reaching out and connecting with the people that they want in their in their ether to not only create a wonderful experience for the guests and make it it memorable, but also to naturally develop know, like, and trust with these people. And as a result, they will invite you into their circle. And when you combine it with what value can I add to this person’s life and some basic fundamental skill shifts, the magic happens? And so, like, I can share some more stuff, but, like, for the interest of time, I created a little 5 video training sessions. It’s it’s it’s at podcasting heroes

Kerry:

Okay.

Laban:

Dotcom. And you can go there and you can do it in your own leisure, but it’ll give you an insight into how to start exactly what I’m talking about. And it’s especially targeted at people if you don’t have a big audience. And it’s the only thing that I’ve done. I don’t teach anything that I haven’t done. So I have to lead by example, and I have to operate with integrity. And you don’t have to. I’ve never paid a guest to come on. I’ve never paid to be a guest, and I’ve been invited to some big shows, you know.

Laban:

This one included Kerry. So, you know, like, it’s just it’s been a it’s been a life changing, and it afforded me the ability to fund the two and a half year travel that we’ve had around the world and Mexico and India and United States and now Colombia, when I never came from an entrepreneurial background prior to that. So it’s just been ridiculous.

Kerry:

I I love that. And I will put for those of you who are listening to this podcast, The link to podcasting heroes will be in the show notes. And if you’re watching this live, I’ll put that up in the comments as well. I would definitely check it out. Do you find that you I’m glad that you mentioned, when you say a list guess, what that means because it is it doesn’t necessarily mean it is a huge household name, but it’s the right person for your audience. It’s their message and the the credibility and the authority and traction that they’ve gained in that particular niche, whatever it is, whether it’s professional development or speaking or media or courage, podcast podcast

Laban:

put me in the room with so many of these incredible people who I love to learn from. And, and just one other thing real quick, like, you know, if you want to make a podcast interesting, bring on people that you’re interested in, not what you think other people are. And I had a huge fight with my father in 2020. And then I wrote a blog about it because I disowned him at the time. And then a friend of mine posted about doctor Fred Luskin, who wrote the, who wrote, or founded the Stanford Forgiveness Project that would help reunite Auschwitz camp survivors with camp commanders and IRA bomb blast victims. And then by me bringing him on and researching him, I learned how to forgive my father and then forgive myself more importantly. And so any issues I have in my life, I just bring on an expert to help solve that challenge.

Kerry:

I love it. No. It’s a great way to get your questions answered. And I more you know, even more so than that, I know you say it sort of tongue in cheek, but the skills that that you’re talking about develop anybody who’s listening to this, and it’s mostly a business audience, but it is applicable to not just your business, but your life. You’re talking about, really, at the end of the day, good communication skills, mental health, you know, emotional strength, but it’s about the way that you communicate that as well and the way you show that to the world or to your dad in this particular case. And so the lessons, much like confidence or courage, are applicable broadly across your life. I don’t want anybody to think that we’re talking about something that’s just about personal or just about business. These are skills that are life skills.

Laban:

Yeah. This is really, like, I will definitely be homeschooling my kids, and this will be a huge part of your learning when they eventually come. So, yeah, I encourage you to do this.

Kerry:

I probably actually need to listen to that episode of your podcast based on my relationship with my own father. So thank you for that.

Laban:

I’ll send you the link afterwards.

Kerry:

Yeah. I I wish we had more time. Please do, by the way. If people are interested in learning a little bit more about what you do, your story, how they might be able to work with you. Again, I’ll put the links to podcast your podcasting heroes program up in the show notes and the comments. But are there other platforms, etcetera, they should check out? How should they get in touch with you?

Laban:

Yes. So I have an OnlyFans account, which is, oh, no. Just kidding.

Kerry:

I was gonna just sort of nodded, and I was waiting to see where that went. Is it up your feet? Because I have that one too.

Laban:

No matter how destitute things got in my life, Gary, my wife, and I never resorted to OnlyFans. No judging to anyone else out there.

Look. Honestly, my wife just redone my website. So you just go to liveandditchburn.com, and it’s got all the links to my book, the the podcast, the links to put anything you want or if you’re just feeling extra adventurous, just punch live and ditch burn into your favorite browser and have a look at the first thing that comes up. And if it’s not a subpoena for a criminal investigation, then you’re probably good.

Kerry:

Okay. That’s good to know. Are there those out there too?

Laban:

That’s another area. I don’t think so.

Kerry:

It was so it was so great to chat with you. I really appreciate you guesting on this program. As I mentioned at the outset, I very rarely have guests. And when I learned about who you were and what you do and the things you talk about, it was a no brainer, and this show has solidified my decision. Like, I really appreciate you being here. Here. Thank you so

Laban:

much. Well, my absolute pleasure. I wanna say something real quick to the audience. Whoever’s watching or listening, if that’s okay. So first thing, shout out to Matt Rincon for the introduction to Kerry.

You’re a superstar. However, if this is the first episode that you’ve listened to or the 41st, I don’t know how many episodes you’ve done, Kerry, and you haven’t, and you’re benefiting from this in some way, shape or form, whatever platform you’re on. I want you to go there straight away and leave a review and then share an episode or 2 with someone you really care about that they might benefit from because we care. The work that Kerry is doing is world class and it’s very, very hard work. The amount of work involved is just mind blowing, mind, mind blowing rather. So I go and leave a review, Good, bad, or indifferent rule helps get organic traffic, and, let’s blow this channel up.

Places to Follow Up Laban:

https://instagram.com/Labanditchburn

https://youtube.com/@byos

https://www.linkedin.com/in/labanditchburn

https://twitter.com/labanditchburn

https://twitter.com/labanditchburn

https://open.spotify.com/show/6LvCbjFlhhQrCckH44z9Ij?si=PHC1RhfUQbixpfNHEloL6A

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/become-your-own-superhero-podcast/id1511122216

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=61556236975585

Get the copy of his book:
https://www.amazon.com/Bet-You-Laban-Michael-Ditchburn/dp/098633099X

Get Laban’s free training program called https://www.podcastingheroes.com/ which serves anyone with a platform (podcast/youtube etc) that is looking to learn how to organically reach out and connect with A-list guests, bring them into your world, develop know like and trust and then organically be brought into their world.

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